How to make a Kick Shot

Written by Mick Turner

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Article Index
How to make a Kick Shot (page 1)
How to make a Kick Shot (page 2)
How to make a Kick Shot (page 3)
How to make a Kick Shot (page 4)
How to make a Kick Shot (page 5)
How to make a Kick Shot (page 6)

When shooting kick shots, many factors come into play. English and speed, will all play a part in the path of the cue ball, and may affect the ultimate OB path as well.

To understand the issues that can affect your success, I will first explain the principals of speed and english.

To see the different cue ball reactions in the speed of a shot, look at Diagram 1. If you center hit a left angle kick shot with no english, medium speed, it will come out at (A), then try to do the exact shot again, only with a harder stroke, the angle of rebound on the cue ball will come up narrow (B), again with slow speed and the cue ball will go wide (C). Why? The speed of the ball hitting and compressing the cushion causes differentsecondary effects. Speed of the kick shot is very important and can be used to advantage.

How to make a Kick Shot - Diagram 1
Diagram 1

In this discussion, "english" is defined as only side spin on the cue ball, it does not include draw or top-spin.

To see the different cue ball reactions using english (cue ball side-spin) on a kick shot, look at Diagram 1 again. If you center hit a left angle kick shot with no english (Diagram 1), medium speed, the cue ball will come out at (A), then try to do the exact shot again, only with a 1 tip of left english on the cue ball, the angle of rebound on the cue ball will come up wide (C); hit it again with 1 tip of right english on the cue ball and it will go narrow (B). Why? Because the english on the cue ball causes it to come off the cushion at more or less of an angle, depending on direction of cue ball english.

There are also effects of rebound that occur depending on whether the cue ball is "back-spinning" or "stunned" (not spinning) off the cushion, but those are more advanced topics not covered here. The assumption is that the cue ball will begin rolling forward somewhat on all the shots I cover in this exercise.

Now that the technical aspects of how hard it may be are behind us, what I want to talk about here is how to "Make a Kick Shot". How do you measure the angles of a shot into and off the cushion? How do you know where to hit? How do you know if more/less speed, or english is necessary?

You may have heard of "angle-in vs. angle-out" on a bank or kick shot. It works assuming other factors are taken into account, such as speed and english, as noted above. What about those times where those angles are not obvious, or where the position of the balls makes it almost impossible to observe angle-in/angle-out? The most important question, is how do you do kick shots consistently? The angle in vs. angle out concept is applied here but this technique teaches you how to "find" the cue ball contact point on a kick shot, or the apex of your shot so the trajectory of the cue ball following the angles in/out are correct.

I have not seen this process for calculating cue ball contact points for kick shots anywhere else, so I might be the first to come up with it, even though I suspect many pro's have this in their heads. I modeled this kick shot process after a similar bank shot method I wrote about in another article that was taken from some tried and proven techniques from various instructions from various pro's that I condensed into understandable steps. I thought about this for quite awhile until I figured it out...I made so much money on the bank shot tutorial, I thought it only natural to come up with a kick shot tutorial...now I'll be twice as rich... ;) LOL...2 times 0 is still 0...

Anyway, I digress and dream of finer days when grass was green and times were good and right after the baseball game there were milk and cookies on the table.....Oh I'm off subject again, back to the kick shot!

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About The Author: Contents and images Copyright 2004, Mick Turner. This information may be shared freely but if used in any commercial way, permission must be obtained at: mick.turner<at sign>sbcglobal<dot>net

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